Music

Aims and Overview of the Music Departmentmusic

The department philosophy is based on the belief that every child has an interest in music.

While not every child will want to participate in public performance, it is hoped that the development of sensitivity towards music through personal experience of performing, listening and composing, will provide a basis for appreciation of a wide variety of music in adult life.

The aims of Music education are:

  • To develop the necessary skills and concepts to enable musical activity.
  • To develop social skills and awareness through making music together.
  • To offer pupils opportunities to experience the personal satisfaction and self-confidence derived from striving after the highest possible standards in musical activity.
  • To develop an awareness of musical traditions and developments in a variety of cultures and societies.

Enrichment

We have many different opportunities for pupils to develop their musical skills outside the classroom environment including the following extra curricular activities :-  Click on links to read more about each activity

Orchestra – Wednesday 3.00-3.40 pm
Junior Choir – Tuesday & Thursday during junior lunch
Senior Choir – Tuesday 3.00-4.00 pm
Flute Ensemble – Wednesday 3.40-4.00 pm
Theory Club – Friday 3.00-4.00 pm

There are also individual/group lessons available in Voice, Strings, Brass, Piano and Woodwind.

Staffing

Mrs C Stewart (Head of Music)
Miss H Beattie
Miss A Francis

Peripatetic Staff

Miss M Johnston (Voice)
Mrs McKay (Strings)
Miss B Simpson (Woodwind)
Mr C Doherty (Brass)
Mr G Simms (Piano)

Facilities

The Music Department is privileged to have a Music Suite consisting of 2 classrooms separated by a communal store. Each classroom has 3 practice rooms. There are also two practice rooms located outside the main classrooms which are used for instrumental provision by the peripatetic and private tutors and also for sixth form private study.

The two main classrooms are equipped with keyboards, tuned and untuned percussion instruments, an interactive whiteboard, computer and printer. In addition there are a number of stand alone computer containing music programmes. The two outside practice rooms contain a piano.

Why Study Music?

Music is the universal language of mankind.” – H.B. Longfellow

Studying Music opens up many opportunities in the field of music and performing arts, both in the world of employment and further study. Music is one of the largest industries in the world and as such provides a variety of job opportunities. Students who have studied A level music with us in Ballyclare Secondary School have gone on to study music at university, some have become teachers, for others it has helped them gain access to their chosen career paths. Many students have continued their interest in music, joining local bands, choirs and music societies.

  • Pupils who study music from an early age can do better at a range of subjects.
  • Pupils who play music learn there are rewards from hard work, practice and discipline.
  • Playing a musical instrument helps develop pupil’s creative thinking and motor skills.
  • Music helps pupils become more active listeners.
  • It can also enhance their health and wellbeing and increase their stamina.

Key Stage 3

The Year 8 Scheme of Work will include the following Units of Work.

  • Keyboard Skills
  • Introduction to Music
  • Fanfares
  • Elements of Music

It is hoped that in the first year pupils will acquire a basic knowledge of

  • Music Theory
  • Keyboard Skills
  • The Elements of Music
  • Develop listening skills
  • Develop performance skills
  • Develop composing skills

Pupils will be assessed in the following areas.

Listening
Performing
Composing

Listen to some examples of Year 8 Keyboard and Group Work performances.

The Year 9 Scheme of Work will include the following units.

The History of Music

  • Medieval
  • Renaissance
  • Baroque
  • Classical
  • Romantic
  • 20th Century

Performing
Keyboard Skills  – This will build upon the work started in year 8.   They will develop their range of notes as well as looking at accidentals.

Listening
During these periods pupils will listen to perform relevant pieces of music. They will learn about musical devices and form and structure.

Composing
Pupils will have the opportunity to compose in the style of the period. It is expected that they will be able to use some of the musical devices discussed in each period to show understanding.

It is hoped that in this year pupils will acquire knowledge and develop their existing skills in

  • Music theory
  • Keyboard skills
  • The History of Music
  • Develop listening skills
  • Develop performance skills
  • Develop composing skills

Pupils will be assessed in the following areas

Listening
Performing
Composing

Listen to an example of a Year 9 Keyboard performance.

The Year 10 Scheme of Work will include the following units.

Film Music
12 Bar Blues
Rock and Rock
Chord Structures

Performance
Keyboard Skills will develop through material from each of the units and in addition there will be an introduction to the bass guitar.

Listening
Pupils will continue to develop their listening skills and will be introduced to a wide variety of styles of music covered within each unit of work.

Composing
Composition skills will develop through the form and structures studied in these units and pupils will have the opportunity to develop composition in a variety of styles relating to the units of work.

It is hoped that in this year pupils will acquire knowledge and develop their existing skills in

  • Music theory
  • Keyboard skills
  • The development of popular music
  • Structure and form and in particular chord structures
  • Develop listening skills
  • Develop performance skills
  • Develop composing skills

Pupils will be assessed in the following areas

Listening
Performing
Composing

Listen to an example of a Year 10 Group Work performance.

GCSE Music

Specification/Exam Board:  CCEA
http://www.ccea.org.uk/music/

Overview

GCSE Music

Pupils studying GCSE Music will have the opportunity to develop listening skills, composing and performance skills through three components

Component 1: Performing and Appraising

  • Students prepare pieces for solo performance and for ensemble performance up to a maximum of 6 mins.
  • They discuss and appraise both their performances and those of others.

Component 2: Composing

  • Students create two compositions.  One is in response to a pre-release stimulus and one is free choice.
  • Composition portfolio must be between 3-6 mins.
  • They record their compositions and provide a score, a lead sheet or a written account of their work.

Component 3: Listening and Appraising

  • External written examination 1 hour 30 minutes.
  • Students answer questions based on familiar and unfamiliar music relating to the Areas of Study.
  1. Western Classical Music 1600–1910
  2. Film Music
  3. Musical Traditions of Ireland
  4. Popular Music 1980–present day

Assessment

Progression Pathway
GCSE Music is an excellent foundation for A level study of Music. It can also lead into further study in sound, music and production courses in Further Education.

A Level

Specification/Exam Board:   CCEA
http://www.ccea.org.uk/music/

Criteria for Entry: Grade B or above in GCSE Music or Grade 5 Theory and Practical Examinations.

This course is designed for students who have taken GCSE Music. A level music incorporates the three fundamental musical activities of composing, performing and listening and appraising.

Summary of Subject Content

AS Level

Pupils will be assessed in three units.

AS 1 – Performing Music. They will undertake:-

  • A solo performance with a viva voce lasting 5-7 mins
  • The standard of performance should be at a level equivalent to at least Grade 4

AS 2 – Composing Music. They will undertake:-

  • To compose one piece of music based on their own brief, compositional style and resources, lasting 1½ – 2 ½ mins.
  • The submission must be in the form of a performance, which may be live or sequenced, recorded on audio CD with optional score.
  • A written commentary using the pro forma provided by CCEA with a maximum word limit of 1000 words.

AS 3 – Responding to Music. Students will take:-

  • A test of aural perception lasting 1 hour and
  • A written examination lasting 2 hours. The written exam will be based on the areas of study, Music for Orchestra, 1700–1900; Sacred Vocal Music (Anthems) and Secular Vocal Music (Musicals). 

A2Level

Pupils will be asses in three units

A2 1Performing Music. They will undertake:-

  • A solo performance with a viva voce lasting 8-10 mins
  • The standard of performance should be at a level equivalent to at least Grade 5

A2 2Composing Music. They will undertake:-

  • To compose one piece of music based on their own brief, compositional style and resources, lasting 2- 3 mins.
  • The submission must be in the form of a performance, which may be live or sequenced, recorded on audio CD with optional score.
  • A written commentary using the pro forma provided by CCEA with a maximum word limit of 1200 words.

A2 2 – Responding to Music. Students will take:-

  • A test of aural perception lasting 1 hour 15 mins and
  • A written examination lasting 2 hours, based on a compulsory areas of study, Music for Orchestra in the Twentieth Century, Sacred Vocal Music (Mass/Requiem Mass) and Secular Vocal Music, 1600 to the Present Day.

Summary of the structures of AS and A2

 

Useful Linkswww.

www.dsokids.com
www.cceamusicmicrosite
www.youtube
www.101musicals.com